#TVFutures


Raechelle Jackson TV-Bay Magazine
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by Raechelle Jackson
Issue 94 - October 2014
The third year level of BSc Television and Broadcasting has become infamous. Students know it will be a hard year long before they join the level, and now I am in that position, I sense both the crackle of fear and anticipation.
So if there is anybody reading this expecting to see comments about hating early lectures, or stories of debauched nights out, seriously, things have changed; we know what we want to do, and student fees are making us choose courses wisely. Specialist courses must produce students that are employable, and any student joining such a course will realise that it's going to be an intensive education to help make that a possibility.
My course has found a way to generate weekly live programme making for our professional TV channel via the curriculum. My course leader, Charlie Watts, is very keen to make sure all students have an opportunity to screen their work via the TV channel, otherwise all that hard work may never see the light of day after assessment. In May 2014 we celebrated the fifth anniversary of our Creative and Cultural Industries (CCI) TV Channel, and as the new cohort of third years start the academic year, some of us will take over TV management roles from students now graduated and employed.
Running a TV channel is punishingly hard, and the academic staff on the course realised very early on that more duties had to be entrusted to students. Over the years the TV student management team has grown in size - this year there are fifteen TV managers, and we expect to help take the course to another level of achievement come May of next year.
I am one of those students faced with the task of building on previous success, and I am fascinated by television management, and in particular programme scheduling.
For me, taking on the role of a CCI Manager was something I've always looked towards since I first knew about the position.
I see scheduling as a hugely important factor within a television channel; using up to date equipment, liaising with staff and students and taking control of the output of the channel is essential. I'm determined to make the channel as varied as possible I also hope to combine this with several thematic days. For example I plan to schedule broadcasts that include projects in the community and environmental issues.


Overall, I welcome this challenge as a learning curve and a chance to expand my knowledge within the television industry, scheduling and understanding audiences.
So, what have I learned thus far about being a TV Scheduler? Well, it came as a surprise to me that my first job wasn't really about learning the hardware or software. My first task was to create a spreadsheet with columns for duration, genre, titles, issues (language, technical), and then I had to watch everything! The next stage will be to learn Audience TV, which has become the backbone of CCI TV and essentially changed it from a typical TV course, to something quite different and special. I am now learning about the placement of appropriate content for the most appropriate time. Add to that the difficulties of fitting and arranging stings and bumpers around our regular shows and I can tell you, my hands are full! I support Charlie's aims and abide to the broadcasting codes and copyright, just like in the real world; we're not student television, but a TV channel run by a student workforce.
I am proud to be a part of the CCi channel along side my peers and I plan to conduct the scheduling of the channel with the professionalism and organisation that it will no doubt demand. I will be linking my role up with my final year project that provides even more theory and understanding whilst being able to really focus on something that you might want to pursue as a career.
So, whilst I can almost taste the fear as I enter into my third year of Television and Broadcasting, the excitement I feel completely overrides it. I relish the opportunity to work alongside several other managers to build upon the success of the CCI TV Channel.
Contribute with your experiences to #tvfutures

Tags: iss094 | #TVFutures | Education | Portsmouth University | CCI | Raechelle Jackson
Contributing Author Raechelle Jackson

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