What is next after University


Ruta Kairyte TV-Bay Magazine
Read ezine online
Download PDF
Download PDF

I currently find myself in between two landmark moments. A few weeks ago I was completely immersed in producing live television content, and in a few weeks time I will become an official BSc (Hons) Television & Broadcasting graduate from the University of Portsmouth. When I look back at who I was in my first year of university, I remember a shy girl from the other side of Europe, unsure at whether a career in television was the right path to take. Now, after three years of university, I can definitely say that I made the best choice of my life by choosing this degree. I’m leaving university confident and motivated, knowing that I made the right choice in study, and I really want that career in the television industry.

On the last day of term we Television & Broadcasting students had the chance to produce a three hour long graduate show, in which we had to showcase the work produced by many of the students from our Creative and Cultural Industries Faculty (CCI). It was the best live broadcast experience I’ve ever had, and I found myself in the roles of both producer and a floor manager. It was a stressful day, I was running from one studio to another, communicating with the crew and interviewees. At some point during the day, I stopped for a minute and I realised how much I enjoy it. It was an epiphany that I don’t remember having before. Perhaps it was because it was the last official show of my degree that I became aware of the pleasure I feel when I’m creating content, being in the studio, and making sure that the show runs smoothly. Whatever it was, I now know that this is exactly what I want to do in my life, this is what make me happy - the excitement I feel when the show is on air and the feeling of relief and pride when the PA counts zero and the show is over.

Today, just a few weeks later, after sending hundreds of CV’s and not getting many responses, I find it helpful to remember that last live broadcast day, and the pleasure and confidence it gave. It helps me to move forward and send the next 10 emails. I know breaking into the TV industry can be quite tough and challenging, and it will require a lot of commitment and hard work. A lesson that the course has taught me is to be open-minded about the variety of jobs available in TV, and to believe in our versatility and ability to do any of the roles - from being a runner to an editor.

Creating a perfect CV, one that clearly shows off all of the skills and experiences that I've acquired can be quite difficult. Talent managers get hundreds of emails every day and I'm lucky if they spend more than seven seconds on my CV. In the last month, I have updated my CV more than 10 times. After meeting with a BBC talent executive, my CV has changed completely, from two pages it has been condensed to a single page showcasing my key skills that can help me to stand out from the crowd. I have to face the reality, nowadays even with a degree impressing an employer can be quite difficult. However, the skills I've gained over these last three years can really help me to make an impression. My course was very vocational (70% practical) and the knowledge of how to use video cameras, sound recording equipment, Avid editing, as well as the creative ability to produce and deliver live TV programmes, are all of the elements that I’ll need to showcase.

I have always wondered how an employer might see past a CV and get an indication that I'm reliable, organised and charismatic. There may always be somebody else with slightly more experience, and a slightly better CV, but if those thoughts enter my head, I think back to the belief instilled in me via the academic course team (Charlie Watts, Zoe Sale & Gary Bown). They believe in me, and this make me believe in myself.

So, I'm ready to start the next chapter of my life and work hard to achieve my goals. I know that I'll have to potentially start at the bottom - This could mean runner roles, but I deeply believe that the simplest yet the most industrious work can give me valuable experience, and anyway, making coffee and tea can be fun! From now on I may have to face more rejection, but as American businessman Mark Cuban once said: “Every no gets me closer to a yes”. So hopefully I'll hear that yes sooner, rather than later.


Tags: iss132 | portsmouth university | ccitv | graduate | bsc | degree | education | cv | Ruta Kairyte
Contributing Author Ruta Kairyte

Read this article in the tv-bay digital magazine
Download PDF
Article Copyright tv-bay limited. All trademarks recognised.
Reproduction of the content strictly prohibited without written consent.

Related Interviews
  • Cinegy at IBC 2015

    Cinegy at IBC 2015

  • Scott Hill uses EditShare: Lightworks at NAB 2013

    Scott Hill uses EditShare: Lightworks at NAB 2013

  • ATEME at NAB 2014

    ATEME at NAB 2014

  • Training and education within the broadcast industry

    Training and education within the broadcast industry

  • Cambridge Imaging Systems at BVE 2014

    Cambridge Imaging Systems at BVE 2014

  • SMPTE on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

    SMPTE on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

  • Polecam at BVE North 2011

    Polecam at BVE North 2011


Related Shows
  • The KITPLUS Show discussing streaming from ingest through to delivery

    The KITPLUS Show discussing streaming from ingest through to delivery


Articles
An Epiphany Moment
Peter Savage 2 I had been negotiating the sale of my company and had reached the really hard end of the bargain. We were close to agreeing the final sum after a lot of too-much-give-and-not-enough-take negotiation. The solicitors were calling me, keen for a deal. It had come down to one sticking point and, in my hard ball “I am the Wolf of Wall Street” guise, I wasn’t going to let it go. It would make a value difference of 1.5% on the total outcome. Not much, you might think, but I had already nearly fallen out with the solicitors over their fees and I was giving my advisors an extremely hard time because the corporate adviser couldn’t see how I had already given more than an inch and the buyers were taking more than a mile. I was not going to let them win.
Tags: iss134 | azule | finance | Peter Savage 2
Contributing Author Peter Savage 2 Click to read or download PDF
Shedding Light on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4k BMCPP4K
Garth de Bruno Austin “What is it about light that has us craving it?” Is the question asked in the opening seconds of Garth de Bruno Austin’s latest short, The Colour of Light. Exploring this natural, human need as well as our innate desire to control it, Garth’s film showcases everyday people going about their lives in differing degrees of luminance, whether that be an artificial streetlight or a natural morning sunrise.
Tags: iss134 | blackmagic | cinema camera | 4k | cpp4k | Garth de Bruno Austin
Contributing Author Garth de Bruno Austin Click to read or download PDF
Giving Welsh sport a global audience
Adam Amor From the Ospreys Rugby Union team, to the Football Association of Wales, as well as national cycling, swimming and boxing coverage, Port Talbot based Buffoon Film and Media has been heavily involved in putting Welsh sports on the world stage.
Tags: iss134 | blackmagic | atem | buffoon | micro studio camera | Adam Amor
Contributing Author Adam Amor Click to read or download PDF
Accelerated Workflows with eGPU
Mike Griggs From the UK’s National Trust to magazine publishers to manufacturers, digital content creator Mike Griggs has a wide and varied portfolio of clients for whom he creates 3D art, motion graphics and multimedia exhibits. A typical day might involve sampling birdsong near Virginia Woolf’s country estate or creating 3D animations for VR. To keep on top of these demands, Griggs wanted to take the full power of the GPU computing revolution on the road.
Tags: iss134 | sonnet | egpu | amd | post production | editing | Mike Griggs
Contributing Author Mike Griggs Click to read or download PDF
State of the Nation - November 2018
Dick Hobbs - new There is an interesting seminar called Size Matters at the KitPlus Show – organised by the publishers of this fine magazine – at MediaCityUK in Salford on 6 November. It’s a talk by cinematographer Alistair Chapman on the way that camera technology is changing, and in particular the size of the electronic device which creates the image is growing.
Tags: iss134 | cmos | 35mm | AJA | Arri | Blackmagic | Canon | Datavideo | GoPro | Grass Valley | Hitachi | Ikegami | JVC | Kinefinity | Nikon | Panasonic | Red | Sony | jpeg2000 | Dick Hobbs - new
Contributing Author Dick Hobbs - new Click to read or download PDF